What we know about water conservation programs in Missouri and other states

A new study by the Water Conservation Project shows that water conservation in Missouri has risen dramatically in recent years.

While the number of Missouri residents in need of water has decreased, the amount of water available has grown dramatically, according to a report by the organization.

“The water supply is a critical part of life in Missouri,” said Jessica D. Johnson, executive director of the Water Conservancy.

“We have water shortages, water outages, and there is no real system for managing that water.”

The group says that while water conservation has improved in recent decades, many other water programs are still failing Missourians.

The report finds that in the years following the Great Recession, water programs in the state fell in need by roughly one-third of their budget.

“These problems are not isolated to water,” Johnson said.

The state was facing the highest level of illegal disposal since 2000, when the EPA found that 2,000 tons of sewage had spilled into a river and riverbed in the St. Louis metropolitan area, contaminating Lake Calhoun. “

For example, in 2014, Missouri was a hotbed of illegal dumping in water.

The state was facing the highest level of illegal disposal since 2000, when the EPA found that 2,000 tons of sewage had spilled into a river and riverbed in the St. Louis metropolitan area, contaminating Lake Calhoun.

In 2015, the Missouri Senate approved a bill that would have allowed water rights holders to use water from the St, Louis River and Missouri River to build their homes and businesses.

But in December, the bill failed in the Missouri House of Representatives, according.

In a statement, Johnson said, “This report confirms that the water we use to grow our food, clean our water, and water our homes is a precious resource.

Water is life, and it is a basic human right.”